Download .net Core Visual Studio Mac

Posted : admin On 11/23/2021

Let’s assume an agile development team, from Developer to Product Owner, from Scrum Master to Stake Holder, all of them working collaboratively on product development.

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Developing ASP.NET Core Applications on a Mac With Visual Studio Code ¶ Start Visual Studio Code; Tap File Open and navigate to your Empty ASP.NET Core app; From a Terminal / bash prompt, run dotnet restore to restore the project’s dependencies. Alternately, you can enter command shift p in Visual Studio Code and then type dot as shown.

Install pre-requisites: In order to use.NET Core, you first need to install the latest version of OpenSSL. The easiest way to get this is from Homebrew. Install.NET Core SDK: The best way to install.NET Core 1.1 on macOS is to download the official installer. Download.NET Core SDK. To download any other version of.NET Core, visit the dotnet page. When using.NET Core 3.0, C# version 8 will be used by default. C# 7.3 is default when using.NET Core 2.x. See C# language versioning for more info. For information on installing a preview version of Visual Studio for Mac, see the Install a Preview Release guide. In this video, Sayed Hashimi shows how.NET Core developers using Visual Studio for Mac can improve their productivity. He'll also demo some features which have been recently added including selecting. Visual Studio Code is a powerful and lightweight source code editor that runs on your desktop. Visual Studio Code is available for Windows, macOS, and Linux. While Visual Studio Code doesn't come with an automated.NET installer like Visual Studio does, adding.NET support is simple. Download and install Visual Studio Code. Download and install.

Sounds great, doesn’t it? But unfortunately, this is not always 100% possible.

So, today we will talk about Behavior Driven Development.

Within the scope of this article, we will refresh our’s knowledge about BDD, after that, we will try to develop an API, that contains basic functions, with BDD approach on macOS using .NET Core and Visual Studio.

Obviously, in order to complete this article, I have been waiting for .NET Core support of SpecFlow for a long time.

In the context of this article, we will refer to the following topics:

  1. Briefly Remembering BDD
  2. Benefits of BDD
  3. BDD on macOS using .NET Core and Visual Studio

Briefly Remembering BDD

BDD, which is based on the Test Driven Development (TDD), is especially concentrating on the producing of “quality code“.

Based on my ~2 years of experience, if I need to say that the great advantages of the BDD have provided us are, firstly it is an important tool against the difficulties that arise from the communication-related problems during the project development phase, and secondly, it provides us with the great project documentation.

So, what are these communication-related difficulties and what are the problems?

Usually, a team, who will develop the project, is dependent on the business teams in order to understand all the needs of the customer correctly.

However, most of the time poorly written code and incomplete needs may appear due to the fact that business teams are far away from the technical side. At this point, BDD provides us a “common language” to solve these problems. In other words, it is acting as a guide to improve communication between developers, test teams and business teams and also to understand the requirements easily.

In addition, BDD clearly defines the behaviors, that will affect the business outcome directly, in a way that is accessible to the developers, test teams and the business teams. The focus of this definition in the BDD is to finding the requirements in the user story and writing the acceptance tests based on the requirements. That is, it draws a path for the development of the project in accordance with end-to-end acceptance criteria.

NOTE: In the BDD, customers also get involved in the development process.

Scenarios

In the BDD, acceptance criteria are defined as “scenarios”. The scenarios are structured and explain how a feature should behave in different situations or with different parameters.

E.g:

  • X person entered the Google.
  • He/she wrote “cat” in the search box.
  • Search results related to “cat” are displayed.

In addition, the scenarios are written in a linguistic format called “Gherkin“, which consists of the Given, When and Then sections.

  • Given: Describes the context of the scenario.
  • When: Defines the action.
  • Then: In here, defines “what will happen”, that is “outcome”.

As we can see, the scenarios are written in a simple form of speaking language, this is making them easy to understand by all team members. It also has the characteristic of documentation for the project.

You can reach more detailed information about this topic from here.

Benefits of BDD

First of all, BDD is one of the methods used in test automation projects. In addition to using the test scenarios written in Gherkin format in the “automation process”, it also provides living and up-to-date documentation of the project.

In general, the benefits are:

  • It offers a simple and understandable language that can be used by each member of the team.
  • Improves cooperation.
  • The focus is on the customer and following the behavior of the application.
  • It provides up-to-date documentation of the project.

Besides, BDD significantly reduces the time spent on “end user” and “user acceptance” tests in the software development process.

BDD on macOS using .NET Core and Visual Studio

Let’s assume we are working in an e-commerce company. We are requested to develop an API so that users can add their favourite products to their favourite lists. Let’s develop this API with BDD and see how it works out.

I will develop the API on macOS using Visual Studio and .NET Core 2.2. Also, we will use SpecFlow as BDD framework.

SpecFlow is an open-source Behavior Driven Design framework that allows us to define and manage human-readable acceptance tests using the Gherkin parser.

Firstly, if you don’t have Visual Studio on macOS, you can download it here. After opening Visual Studio, let’s enter the “Extensions” tab then click to the “Gallery” tab. Now we need to type “Straight8’s SpecFlow Integration” in the search box and then install the related extension as follows.

With this extension, we will be able to add features and step definitions to our project easily.

Now let’s create a .NET Core 2.2 NUnit Test Project called “MyFavouriteAPI.Tests“. Then, we need to include “SpecFlow“, “SpecFlow.Tools.MsBuild.Generation” and “SpecFlow.NUnit” packages to the project via NuGet.

For general configuration options, we should create a configuration file called “specflow.json” as follows.

With this option, we specify that the feature files will be in English.

After creating the configuration file, let’s create a new folder called “Features“. Then add a new feature file in this folder called “FavouriteList” as follows.

The extension will create a template feature file as below.

Now let’s create our own feature script by editing the contents of this template.

Defining the Scenario

What we want as a feature is that “users can create own favourite list and add or remove products from the list in order to buy them later“.

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So, let’s edit the feature as follows.

Now we can define our first scenario. Firstly, we need to create a favourite list. To do that, let’s called the scenario part as “create a new favourite list“.

So when this scenario will happen, what is the action here? For the definition of the action here, I think it is enough to say “when I create a new favourite list“. Now, what will be the result of this operation, what is the outcome here?

For this, we can say “then the favourite list should be created as empty“. Based on this scenario, let’s edit the feature file as follows.

This scenario, which we have described above, clearly explains how the work will be done, doesn’t it? A simple language that can be used and understood by each member of the team.

Coding the Scenario

After defining the scenario, let’s build the project and switch to the “Unit Tests” pad through the IDE.

Ahha! After building the project, the extension has created the “CreateANewFavouriteList” test for us.

So, let’s run the test and look at the result on the test result pad.

It gives us the “No matching step definition found for one or more steps.” message because we haven’t written any code yet.

Now we need to define the step definitions related to our scenario. For this, we can use the sample code snippet that the extension gave us in the result pad.

Let’s create a folder called “StepDefinitions” and define a class in this folder called “FavouriteListSteps“.

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Then copy the sample code snippet and paste it into the “FavouriteListSteps” class as follows.

NOTE: Don’t forget to edit “MyNamespace” and “StepDefinitions” parts.

It’s pretty clear what we are supposed to do here, right?

Before start to coding, we need to include the “FluentAssertions” package via NuGet to perform assertions easily.

Then, let’s start coding to our sample scenario as follows.

We simply coded “When” and “Then” steps. First, we have created a new favourite list for the user, then we verified that the favourite list is empty.

Now let’s run the “CreateANewFavouriteList” test again.

As we can see the test passed successfully.

Now we need to add one more new scenario to the feature. The user should be able to add products to his/her favourite list also delete them.

For that, let’s extend our scenario as follows.

After saving the scenario, we need to rebuild the project and then take a look at the “Unit Tests” pad again.

After building the project, the extension has created the tests for the scenario, that we have defined newly, named “AddANewProductToTheFavouriteList” and “RemoveAProductFromTheFavouriteList“.

Let’s run the tests and take the sample method snippets on the test result pad again.

Now, in order to complete the feature, we need to implement these behaviors, which are expected from us, in the “FavouriteListSteps” class as follows.

I would like to mention a few points here. If there is a similar scenario that we have implemented before, we don’t need to re-code it. All we have to do is add the “Given” context in the right place as in the feature file.

For example, to be able to add a new product into a favourite list or delete, first we need to create a favourite list. In order to do this, it will be enough to add “[Given(@”I create a new favourite list”)]” attribute to the “WhenICreateANewFavouriteList” method we have implemented before.

Then, we have implemented the behaviours expected from us. Now let’s go back to the “Unit Tests” pad and run all the tests.

Tada! All the scenarios’ tests, that are required to complete the “FavouriteList” feature, are passed successfully.

When talking about the benefits of BDD at the beginning of this article, we have mentioned the following topics:

  • It offers a simple and understandable language that can be used by each member of the team.
  • Improves cooperation.
  • The focus is on the customer and following the behavior of the application.
  • It provides up-to-date documentation of the project.

Now let’s take a look at the feature file that we created.

This feature file has a simple and understandable language that can be used by each member of the team and also it is up-to-date documentation of the project. During the development process, it guided our code by following the behaviour of the application.

Conclusion

BDD is an important methodology that can be used especially when cooperation is needed in product development. It focuses on the user and the behaviour of the application, thus it minimizes maintenance and additional efforts. It also supports the test automation process by creating up-to-date documentation of the project.

Link: https://github.com/GokGokalp/BDDSampleWithNetCoreSpecFlow

References

https://specflow.org/getting-started/
https://specflow.org/documentation/
https://specflow.org/2018/specflow-3-public-preview-now-available/

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In this article, you'll learn how to install .NET on macOS. .NET is made up of the runtime and the SDK. The runtime is used to run a .NET app and may or may not be included with the app. The SDK is used to create .NET apps and libraries. The .NET runtime is always installed with the SDK.

The latest version of .NET is 5.0.

Supported releases

The following table is a list of currently supported .NET releases and the versions of macOS they're supported on. These versions remain supported either the version of .NET reaches end-of-support.

  • A ✔️ indicates that the version of .NET Core is still supported.
  • A ❌ indicates that the version of .NET Core isn't supported.
Operating System.NET Core 2.1.NET Core 3.1.NET 5.0
macOS 10.15 'Catalina'✔️ 2.1 (Release notes)✔️ 3.1 (Release notes)✔️ 5.0 (Release notes)
macOS 10.14 'Mojave'✔️ 2.1 (Release notes)✔️ 3.1 (Release notes)✔️ 5.0 (Release notes)
macOS 10.13 'High Sierra'✔️ 2.1 (Release notes)✔️ 3.1 (Release notes)✔️ 5.0 (Release notes)
macOS 10.12 'Sierra'✔️ 2.1 (Release notes)❌ 3.1 (Release notes)❌ 5.0 (Release notes)

Unsupported releases

The following versions of .NET are ❌ no longer supported. The downloads for these still remain published:

  • 3.0 (Release notes)
  • 2.2 (Release notes)
  • 2.0 (Release notes)

Runtime information

The runtime is used to run apps created with .NET. When an app author publishes an app, they can include the runtime with their app. If they don't include the runtime, it's up to the user to install the runtime.

Studio

There are three different runtimes you can install on macOS:

ASP.NET Core runtime
Runs ASP.NET Core apps. Includes the .NET runtime.

.NET runtime
This runtime is the simplest runtime and doesn't include any other runtime. It's highly recommended that you install ASP.NET Core runtime for the best compatibility with .NET apps.

SDK information

The SDK is used to build and publish .NET apps and libraries. Installing the SDK includes both runtimes: ASP.NET Core and .NET.

Dependencies

.NET is supported on the following macOS releases:

.NET Core VersionmacOSArchitecturesMore information
5.0High Sierra (10.13+)x64More information
3.1High Sierra (10.13+)x64More information
3.0High Sierra (10.13+)x64More information
2.2Sierra (10.12+)x64More information
2.1Sierra (10.12+)x64More information

Beginning with macOS Catalina (version 10.15), all software built after June 1, 2019 that is distributed with Developer ID, must be notarized. This requirement applies to the .NET runtime, .NET SDK, and software created with .NET.

The runtime and SDK installers for .NET 5.0 and .NET Core 3.1, 3.0, and 2.1, have been notarized since February 18, 2020. Prior released versions aren't notarized. If you run a non-notarized app, you'll see an error similar to the following image:

For more information about how enforced-notarization affects .NET (and your .NET apps), see Working with macOS Catalina Notarization.

libgdiplus

.NET applications that use the System.Drawing.Common assembly require libgdiplus to be installed.

Net Core Visual Studio 2017

An easy way to obtain libgdiplus is by using the Homebrew ('brew') package manager for macOS. After installing brew, install libgdiplus by executing the following commands at a Terminal (command) prompt:

Install with an installer

Visual Studio Mp3

macOS has standalone installers that can be used to install the .NET 5.0 SDK:

Download and manually install

As an alternative to the macOS installers for .NET, you can download and manually install the SDK and runtime. Manual install is usually performed as part of continuous integration testing. For a developer or user, it's generally better to use an installer.

If you install .NET SDK, you don't need to install the corresponding runtime. First, download a binary release for either the SDK or the runtime from one of the following sites:

  • ✔️ .NET 5.0 downloads
  • ✔️ .NET Core 3.1 downloads
  • ✔️ .NET Core 2.1 downloads

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Next, extract the downloaded file and use the export command to set variables used by .NET and then ensure .NET is in PATH.

To extract the runtime and make the .NET CLI commands available at the terminal, first download a .NET binary release. Then, open a terminal and run the following commands from the directory where the file was saved. The archive file name may be different depending on what you downloaded.

Use the following command to extract the runtime:

Use the following command to extract the SDK:

Tip

The preceding export commands only make the .NET CLI commands available for the terminal session in which it was run.

You can edit your shell profile to permanently add the commands. There are a number of different shells available for Linux and each has a different profile. For example:

Visual Studio Mac .net Core

  • Bash Shell: ~/.bash_profile, ~/.bashrc
  • Korn Shell: ~/.kshrc or .profile
  • Z Shell: ~/.zshrc or .zprofile

Edit the appropriate source file for your shell and add :$HOME/dotnet to the end of the existing PATH statement. If no PATH statement is included, add a new line with export PATH=$PATH:$HOME/dotnet.

Also, add export DOTNET_ROOT=$HOME/dotnet to the end of the file.

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This approach lets you install different versions into separate locations and choose explicitly which one to use by which application.

Install with Visual Studio for Mac

Visual Studio for Mac installs the .NET SDK when the .NET workload is selected. To get started with .NET development on macOS, see Install Visual Studio 2019 for Mac.

.NET SDK versionVisual Studio version
5.0Visual Studio 2019 for Mac version 8.8 or higher.
3.1Visual Studio 2019 for Mac version 8.4 or higher.
2.1Visual Studio 2019 for Mac version 8.0 or higher.

Install alongside Visual Studio Code

Visual Studio Code is a powerful and lightweight source code editor that runs on your desktop. Visual Studio Code is available for Windows, macOS, and Linux.

While Visual Studio Code doesn't come with an automated .NET installer like Visual Studio does, adding .NET support is simple.

  1. Download and install Visual Studio Code.
  2. Download and install the .NET SDK.
  3. Install the C# extension from the Visual Studio Code marketplace.

Install with bash automation

The dotnet-install scripts are used for automation and non-admin installs of the runtime. You can download the script from the dotnet-install script reference page.

The script defaults to installing the latest long term support (LTS) version, which is .NET Core 3.1. You can choose a specific release by specifying the current switch. Include the runtime switch to install a runtime. Otherwise, the script installs the SDK.

Note

The previous command installs the ASP.NET Core runtime for maximum compatability. The ASP.NET Core runtime also includes the standard .NET runtime.

Docker

Containers provide a lightweight way to isolate your application from the rest of the host system. Containers on the same machine share just the kernel and use resources given to your application.

.NET can run in a Docker container. Official .NET Docker images are published to the Microsoft Container Registry (MCR) and are discoverable at the Microsoft .NET Core Docker Hub repository. Each repository contains images for different combinations of the .NET (SDK or Runtime) and OS that you can use.

Microsoft provides images that are tailored for specific scenarios. For example, the ASP.NET Core repository provides images that are built for running ASP.NET Core apps in production.

For more information about using .NET Core in a Docker container, see Introduction to .NET and Docker and Samples.

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Next steps

  • How to check if .NET Core is already installed.
  • Working with macOS Catalina notarization.
  • Tutorial: Get started on macOS.
  • Tutorial: Create a new app with Visual Studio Code.
  • Tutorial: Containerize a .NET Core app.