Download Java Version 1.8.0_77 Mac

Posted : admin On 11/24/2021
  1. Download Java Version 1.8.0_77 Macos
  2. Java 1.8 Update 77
  3. Download Java 1.8.0_77
  4. Download Java Version 1.8.0_77 Mac Os
  5. 1.8.0_77 Java Download

This wikiHow will teach you how to check what version of Java you have installed on your Mac by checking the System Preferences, using the Java website, or by using your Mac's Terminal. It's the Apple icon in the upper-left of the. Java SE 8 Archive Downloads (JDK 8u211 and later) Go to the Oracle Java Archive page. The JDK is a development environment for building applications using the Java programming language. The JDK includes tools useful for developing and testing programs written in the Java programming language and running on the Java TM platform. This tutorial we cover how to download and install the older or archived version of java. This tutorial covers the java version JDK 1.860 install on platform Windows 10. Let’s begin the installation. Step1: Go to the JDK Download URL Scroll down and find Java Archive Click Download. This will take you to the Java archive version page.

Question or issue on macOS:

I want to install OpenJDK Java on Mac OSX and have it work alongside other JDK’s since it is a newer release. Currently, I downloaded the tar.gz and placed it in my path but that is hard to maintain.

The only other install I found that do more things automatically is the install via Homebrew cask. It looks like only the current version too:

Shows:

So I can install it from there, but then what? Am I stuck only with the new version?

How to solve this problem?

Solution no. 1:

Note:These solutions work for various versions of Java including Java 8, Java 11, and the new Java 15, and for any other previous Java version covered by the listed version managers. This includes alternative JDK’s from OpenJDK, Oracle, IBM, Azul, Amazon Correto, Graal and more. Easily work with Java 7, Java 8, Java 9, Java 10, Java 11, Java 12, Java 13, Java 14, and Java 15!

You have a few options for how to do the installation as well as manage JDK switching. Installation can be done by Homebrew, SDKMAN, Jabba, or a manual install. Switching can be done by JEnv, SDKMAN, Jabba, or manually by setting JAVA_HOME. All of these are described below.

Installation

First, install Java using whatever method you prefer including Homebrew, SDKMAN or a manual install of the tar.gz file. The advantage of a manual install is that the location of the JDK can be placed in a standardized location for Mac OSX. Otherwise, there are easier options such as SDKMAN that also will install other important and common tools for the JVM.

Installing and Switching versions with SDKMAN

SDKMAN is a bit different and handles both the install and the switching. SDKMAN also places the installed JDK’s into its own directory tree, which is typically ~/.sdkman/candidates/java. SDKMAN allows setting a global default version, and a version specific to the current shell.

  1. Install SDKMAN from https://sdkman.io/install

  2. List the Java versions available to make sure you know the version ID

  3. Install one of those versions, for example, Java 15:

  4. Make 15 the default version:

    Or switch to 15 for the session:

When you list available versions for installation using the list command, you will see a wide variety of distributions of Java:

And install additional versions, such as JDK 8:

SDKMAN can work with previously installed existing versions. Just do a local install giving your own version label and the location of the JDK:

And use it freely:

More information is available in the SDKMAN Usage Guide along with other SDK’s it can install and manage.

SDKMAN will automatically manage your PATH and JAVA_HOME for you as you change versions.

Install manually from OpenJDK download page:
  1. Download OpenJDK for Mac OSX from http://jdk.java.net/ (for example Java 15)

  2. Unarchive the OpenJDK tar, and place the resulting folder (i.e. jdk-15.jdk) into your /Library/Java/JavaVirtualMachines/ folder since this is the standard and expected location of JDK installs. You can also install anywhere you want in reality.

Install with Homebrew

The version of Java available in Homebrew Cask previous to October 3, 2018 was indeed the Oracle JVM. Now, however, it has now been updated to OpenJDK. Be sure to update Homebrew and then you will see the lastest version available for install.

  1. install Homebrew if you haven’t already. Make sure it is updated:

  2. Add the casks tap, if you want to use the AdoptOpenJDK versions (which tend to be more current):

    These casks change their Java versions often, and there might be other taps out there with additional Java versions.

  3. Look for installable versions:

    or for AdoptOpenJDK versions:

  4. Check the details on the version that will be installed:

    or for the AdoptOpenJDK version:

  5. Install a specific version of the JDK such as java11, adoptopenjdk8, or adoptopenjdk13, or just java or adoptopenjdk for the most current of that distribution. For example:

And these will be installed into /Library/Java/JavaVirtualMachines/ which is the traditional location expected on Mac OSX.

Other installation options:

Some other flavours of OpenJDK are:

Azul Systems Java Zulu certified builds of OpenJDK can be installed by following the instructions on their site.


Zulu® is a certified build of OpenJDK that is fully compliant with the Java SE standard. Zulu is 100% open source and freely downloadable. Now Java developers, system administrators, and end-users can enjoy the full benefits of open source Java with deployment flexibility and control over upgrade timing.

Amazon Correto OpenJDK builds have an easy to use an installation package for Java 8 or Java 11, and installs to the standard /Library/Java/JavaVirtualMachines/ directory on Mac OSX.


Amazon Corretto is a no-cost, multiplatform, production-ready distribution of the Open Java Development Kit (OpenJDK). Corretto comes with long-term support that will include performance enhancements and security fixes. Amazon runs Corretto internally on thousands of production services and Corretto is certified as compatible with the Java SE standard. With Corretto, you can develop and run Java applications on popular operating systems, including Linux, Windows, and macOS.

Where is my JDK?!?!

To find locations of previously installed Java JDK’s installed at the default system locations, use:


Matching Java Virtual Machines (8):
15, x86_64: “OpenJDK 15” /Library/Java/JavaVirtualMachines/jdk-15.jdk/Contents/Home
14, x86_64: “OpenJDK 14” /Library/Java/JavaVirtualMachines/jdk-14.jdk/Contents/Home
13, x86_64: “OpenJDK 13” /Library/Java/JavaVirtualMachines/openjdk-13.jdk/Contents/Home
12, x86_64: “OpenJDK 12” /Library/Java/JavaVirtualMachines/jdk-12.jdk/Contents/Home
11, x86_64: “Java SE 11” /Library/Java/JavaVirtualMachines/jdk-11.jdk/Contents/Home
10.0.2, x86_64: “Java SE 10.0.2” /Library/Java/JavaVirtualMachines/jdk-10.0.2.jdk/Contents/Home
9, x86_64: “Java SE 9” /Library/Java/JavaVirtualMachines/jdk-9.jdk/Contents/Home
1.8.0_144, x86_64: “Java SE 8” /Library/Java/JavaVirtualMachines/jdk1.8.0_144.jdk/Contents/Home

You can also report just the location of a specific Java version using -v. For example for Java 15:


/Library/Java/JavaVirtualMachines/jdk-15.jdk/Contents/Home

Knowing the location of the installed JDK’s is also useful when using tools like JEnv, or adding a local install to SDKMAN, or linking a system JDK in Jabba — and you need to know where to find them.

If you need to find JDK’s installed by other tools, check these locations:

  • SDKMAN installs to ~/.sdkman/candidates/java/
  • Jabba installs to ~/.jabba/jdk
Switching versions manually

The Java executable is a wrapper that will use whatever JDK is configured in JAVA_HOME, so you can change that to also change which JDK is in use.

For example, if you installed or untar’d JDK 15 to /Library/Java/JavaVirtualMachines/jdk-15.jdk if it is the highest version number it should already be the default, if not you could simply set:

And now whatever Java executable is in the path will see this and use the correct JDK.

Using the /usr/libexec/java_home utility as previously described helps you to create aliases or to run commands to change Java versions by identifying the locations of different JDK installations. For example, creating shell aliases in your .profile or .bash_profile to change JAVA_HOME for you:

Then to change versions, just use the alias.


java version “1.8.0_144”

Of course, setting JAVA_HOME manually works too!

Switching versions with JEnv

JEnv expects the Java JDK’s to already exist on the machine and can be in any location. Typically you will find installed Java JDK’s in /Library/Java/JavaVirtualMachines/. JEnv allows setting the global version of Java, one for the current shell, and a per-directory local version which is handy when some projects require different versions than others.

  1. Install JEnv if you haven’t already, instructions on the site http://www.jenv.be/ for manual install or using Homebrew.

  2. Add any Java version to JEnv (adjust the directory if you placed this elsewhere):

  3. Set your global version using this command:

Download Java Version 1.8.0_77 Macos

You can also add other existing versions using jenv add in a similar manner, and list those that are available. For example Java 8:

See the JEnv docs for more commands. You may now switch between any Java versions (Oracle, OpenJDK, other) at any time either for the whole system, for shells, or per local directory.

To help manage JAVA_HOME while using JEnv you can add the export plugin to do this for you.

The export plugin may not adjust JAVA_HOME if it is already set, so you may need to clear this variable in your profile so that it can be managed by JEnv.

You can also use jenv exec <command> <parms...> to run single commands with JAVA_HOME and PATH set correctly for that one command, which could include opening another shell.

Installing and Switching versions with Jabba

Jabba also handles both the install and the switching. Jabba also places the installed JDK’s into its own directory tree, which is typically ~/.jabba/jdk.

  1. Install Jabba by following the instructions on the home page.

  2. List available JDK’s

    jabba ls-remote

  3. Install Java JDK 12

    jabba install [email protected]

  4. Use it:

    jabba use [email protected]

You can also alias version names, link to existing JDK’s already installed, and find a mix of interesting JDK’s such as GraalVM, Adopt JDK, IBM JDK, and more. The complete usage guide is available on the home page as well.

Jabba will automatically manage your PATH and JAVA_HOME for you as you change versions.

Solution no. 2:

This is how I did it.

Step 1: Install Java 11

You can download Java 11 dmg for mac from here: https://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/downloads/jdk11-downloads-5066655.html

Step 2: After installation of Java 11. Confirm installation of all versions. Type the following command in your terminal.

Step 3: Edit .bash_profile

Step 4: Add 11.0.1 as default. (Add below line to bash_profile file).

to switch to any version

Now Press CTRL+X to exit the bash. Press ‘Y’ to save changes.

Step 5: Reload bash_profile

Step 6: Confirm current version of Java

Solution no. 3:

Manually switching system-default version without 3rd party tools:

As detailed in this older answer, on macOS /usr/bin/java is a wrapper tool that will use Java version pointed by JAVA_HOME or if that variable is not set will look for Java installations under /Library/Java/JavaVirtualMachines/ and will use the one with highest version. It determines versions by looking at Contents/Info.plist under each package.

Java version 1.8.0 64 bit

Armed with this knowledge you can:

  • control which version the system will use by renaming Info.plist in versions you don’t want to use as default (that file is not used by the actual Java runtime itself).
  • control which version to use for specific tasks by setting $JAVA_HOME

I’ve just verified this is still true with OpenJDK & Mojave.

On a brand new system, there is no Java version installed:

Cancel this, download OpenJDK 11 & 12ea on https://jdk.java.net ;
install OpenJDK11:

System java is now 11:

Install OpenJDK12 (early access at the moment):

System java is now 12:

Now let’s “hide” OpenJDK 12 from system java wrapper:

System java is back to 11:

And you can still use version 12 punctually by manually setting JAVA_HOME:

Solution no. 4:

With Homebrew and jenv:

Assumption: Mac machine and you already have installed homebrew.

Install cask:

To install latest java:

To install java 8:

To install java 9:

If you want to install/manage multiple version then you can use ‘jenv’:

Install and configure jenv:

Add the installed java to jenv:

To see all the installed java:

Above command will give the list of installed java:

Configure the java version which you want to use:

Solution no. 5:

If you have multiple versions installed on your machine, add the following in bash profile:


export JAVA_HOME_7=$(/usr/libexec/java_home -v1.7)
export JAVA_HOME_8=$(/usr/libexec/java_home -v1.8)
export JAVA_HOME_9=$(/usr/libexec/java_home -v9)

Java 1.8 Update 77

And add the following aliases:


alias java7=’export JAVA_HOME=$JAVA_HOME_7′
alias java8=’export JAVA_HOME=$JAVA_HOME_8′
alias java9=’export JAVA_HOME=$JAVA_HOME_9′

And can switch to required version by using the alias:

In terminal:

~ >> java7
export JAVA_HOME=$JAVA_7_HOME

Solution no. 6:

Another alternative is using SDKMAN! See https://wimdeblauwe.wordpress.com/2018/09/26/switching-between-jdk-8-and-11-using-sdkman/

First install SDKMAN: https://sdkman.io/install and then…

  1. Install Oracle JDK 8 with: sdk install java 8.0.181-oracle
  2. Install OpenJDK 11 with: sdk install java 11.0.0-open

To switch:

  • Switch to JDK 8 with sdk use java 8.0.181-oracle
  • Switch to JDK 11 with sdk use java 11.0.0-open

To set a default:

  • Default to JDK 8 with sdk default java 8.0.181-oracle
  • Default to JDK 11 with sdk default java 11.0.0-open

Solution no. 7:

You can use asdf to install and switch between multiple java versions. It has plugins for other languages as well. You can install asdf with Homebrew

When asdf is configured, install java plugin

Pick a version to install

For example to install and configure adoptopenjdk8

And finally if needed, configure JAVA_HOME for your shell. Just add to your shell init script such as ~/.zshrc in case of zsh:

Solution no. 8:

IMHO, There is no need to install all the additional applications/packages.

Check available versions using the command:

Now if you want to pick Azul JDK 8 in the above list, and NOT Oracle’s Java SE 8, invoke the command as below:

To pick Oracle’s Java SE 8 you would invoke the command:

Download Java 1.8.0_77

As you can see the version number provided shall be the unique set of strings: 1.8.0_181 vs 1.8.0_151

Solution no. 9:

This answer extends on Jayson’s excellent answer with some more opinionated guidance on the best approach for your use case:

  • SDKMAN is the best solution for most users. It’s easy to use, doesn’t have any weird configuration, and makes managing multiple versions for lots of other Java ecosystem projects easy as well.
  • Downloading Java versions via Homebrew and switching versions via jenv is a good option, but requires more work. For example, the Homebrew commands in this highly upvoted answer don’t work anymore. jenv is slightly harder to setup, the plugins aren’t well documented, and the README says the project is looking for a new maintainer. jenv is still a great project, solves the job, and the community should be thankful for the wonderful contribution. SDKMAN is just the better option cause it’s so great.
  • Jabba is written is a multi-platform solution that provides the same interface on Mac, Windows, and PC (it’s written in Go and that’s what allows it to be multiplatform). If you care about a multiplatform solution, this is a huge selling point. If you only care about running multiple versions on your Mac, then you don’t need a multiplatform solution. SDKMAN’s support for tens of popular SDKs is what you’re missing out on if you go with Jabba.

Managing versions manually is probably the worst option. If you decide to manually switch versions, you can use this Bash code instead of Jayson’s verbose code (code snippet from the homebrew-openjdk README:

Jayson’s answer provides the basic commands for SDKMAN and jenv. Here’s more info on SDKMAN and more info on jenv if you’d like more background on these tools.

Solution no. 10:

To stay with a specific major release, activate the AdoptOpenJDK tap with brew tap and then install the desired version with brew cask install:

To install AdoptOpenJDK 14 with HotSpot, run:

Hope this helps!

Java™ SE Development Kit 8, Update 77 (JDK 8u77)

The full version string for this update release is 1.8.0_77-b03 (where 'b' means 'build'). The version number is 8u77.

This update release contains several enhancements and changes including the following.

Download Java Version 1.8.0_77 Mac Os

IANA Data 2016a

JDK 8u77 contains IANA time zone data version 2016a. For more information, refer to Timezone Data Versions in the JRE Software.

Security Baselines

The security baselines for the Java Runtime Environment (JRE) at the time of the release of JDK 8u77 are specified in the following table:

JRE Family VersionJRE Security Baseline (Full Version String)
81.8.0_77
71.7.0_99
61.6.0_111

For more information about security baselines, see Deploying Java Applets With Family JRE Versions in Java Plug-in for Internet Explorer.

JRE Expiration Date

The JRE expires whenever a new release with security vulnerability fixes becomes available. Critical patch updates, which contain security vulnerability fixes, are announced one year in advance on Critical Patch Updates, Security Alerts and Third Party Bulletin. This JRE (version 8u77) will expire with the release of the next critical patch update scheduled for April 19, 2016.

For systems unable to reach the Oracle Servers, a secondary mechanism expires this JRE (version 8u77) on May 19, 2016. After either condition is met (new release becoming available or expiration date reached), the JRE will provide additional warnings and reminders to users to update to the newer version. For more information, see JRE Expiration Date.

Notes

This Security Alert (8u77) is based on the earlier 8u74 PSU release. All users of earlier JDK 8 releases should update to this release. For more information on the difference between Critical Patch Updates and Patch Set Updates please visit Java CPU and PSU Releases Explained.

The demos, samples, and Documentation bundles for 8u77 are not impacted by the Security Alert for CVE-2016-0636, so version 8u73 demos, samples, and Documentation bundles remain the most up to-date version until the April Critical Patch Update release.

Bug Fixes

1.8.0_77 Java Download

This release contains fixes for security vulnerabilities. For more information, see Oracle Java SE Critical Patch Update Advisory.